Wednesday, December 14, 2011

"Restart WW1" .. first fruits.

I'm surprised at how quickly I've managed to get back into the swing of things with my "Restart WW1" project (although the end of the academic year helps). So here are the first fruits of my labour (and the first 20mm WW1 figures I've painted in quite some time). The three guns (HaT Putilov 76mm field guns) represent a Great War Spearhead artillery regiment, with each model representing a battery. These guns are horse artillery (hence the blue trousers on the crew), while the remainder of the guns I paint will be field artillery.



I thought I'd pose them with some cavalry (Dragoons) to create a little of the feel of these guys on the table top. The foot figures are Hat Russian infantry, while the mounteds are Strelets Russian Dragoons.


My earlier work on WW1 armies can be seen here:

http://www.wargaming.org.nz/

if anyone is interested.

10 comments:

  1. Impressive.
    Both quality, and speed :)

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  2. Stan
    Thanks.. mind you that's what finishing the term can do for you, and there's no point doing anything to the house until we know what its fate is, so what else is there? PAINTING!!!

    R

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  3. Very Nice Robin. I have some metal Putilovs awaiting completion - they are the Battle Honors ones which have the wrong (long 1928-ish) barrel so need shortening to have the snub nosed chimney pot style like your HäT ones correctly have...

    Keep up the great work - I was wondering when you were going to get back to WW1?

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  4. Thanks John..You are obviously enjoying TSATF wiht the 28s.. some beautiful figures, and your paint jobs do them justice.

    I was inspired to get back to WW1 by Robert and Shawn's Cambrai recreation in London, and the appearance of a new eastern front fan on the GWSH Yahoo group... the recovery from the EQs has been harder than many of us a prepared to admit. This is a part of my own personal therapy now that the stress and struggle of getting work back on track has abated with the end of the term.

    Kind regards
    Robin

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  5. P.S. Weren't the Blue Trousers with red stripe standard for all Russian Artillery troops (along with the 'green' tunic) up to 1913-1914, and when the Russian Army switched to the new simpler Khaki Green uniforms some troops and units retained older uniforms (or parts of uniforms) well into 1916 or so until they were replaced or needed replacing with the new simpler pattern...

    I've seen several photos of troops reportedly in 1916 with blue trousers, incl. Infantry Officers, and even odd Infantry and Artillery men with the pre-war Green or similar tunics mixed amongst the wartime Khaki-Green uniformed guys...

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  6. ...some beautiful figures, and your paint jobs do them justice

    Actually I bought 2 of the guns & crews painted from a chap in the USA. A friend up here then touched them up for me at the same time as assembling the 3rd gun & painting it's crew - he added the green pants to the artillery for variety and did the really nice touch to the gun wheels painting the spokes natural wood... I just need to fix the anachronistic gun barrels.

    BTW - I see I had my wires crossed - you are right of course it's blue for Horse, and Green for Foot artillery (which my chaps are)...

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  7. ...the recovery from the EQs has been harder than many of us a prepared to admit. This is a part of my own personal therapy...

    Yes - I can imagine - all my best with that...

    Great to see you doing some WW1 again though - I thought you were becoming a bit of a die-hard HotT-ist! :)

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  8. John

    The issue of Russian uniforms seems to be quite a vexed question.. and there appears to be scope for lots of variation .. seemimngly because of the huge expansion/recruitment that occured in 1914, and the inability of the industrial complex to cope. However as I've just commented on the GWSH Yahoo group, I wonder what the situation actually was. Is that interpretation correct, or is it thought to be correct simply because enough people have repeated it? That's a huge issue with WW1 history generally of course.

    However your second post seesm t represent the norm as far as I can tell.

    Kind regards
    Robin

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